Writing with Isaac in the 21st century

Two years ago, I attended a brilliant Digital Humanities conference in Sheffield, with several very impressive papers. I was allowed to present some of my research, received generous feedback, and subsequently responded to the call for papers for the conference proceedings. It took a while, but I just received word that the proceedings are out!…

Isaac Newton moves to Oxford

It has been nearly two months since my last blogpost, which is a) rather a long time, and b) quite unusual. Teaching duties, Newton Project business, my own research: yours truly has been busy. But I have some exciting news. Read on…

To the unknown scribe – Isaac Newton’s assistants

Over the past year and a half I have been blogging about many things Newtonian. Some of these are of a more general nature, involving Newton’s life and works, while others are more directly related to my main research project. That main project involves Newton as a reader of books, a taker of notes, and…

Folding pages (Scenes from the Library of Isaac Newton, Part 2)

  Last week y’all got the crash course on how to recognise a Newton book, and boy did it pay off! There’s even rumours that more is to come soon. In the mean time yours truly spent an exciting week leafing through all sorts of rare books in the Huntington Library‘s Ahmanson Reading Room. Only…

Showcasing the Digital: Exhibit A

A new Newton post is on the way, but in the mean time, enjoy this report of the British Library Labs / Sussex Humanities Labs day held @SussexUni on April 8th! With links, vids, and old jokes.

Showcasing the Digital

For all those digitally inclined: the Sussex Humanities Lab and British Library Lab are co-hosting a one day event called Showcasing the Digital. Definitely worthwhile, I say, not in the least because, well, I happen to be one of the organisers… Be there!

SIN meets LSA

A few weeks back I had the opportunity to spend time with some of the wonderful people at Indiana University. Together we worked on all things Newtonian, and in particular on a computational method called Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA). This is a technique that originates from the early 80s and has some of its roots…

It’s all Greek to me

Last week I had the opportunity to show some of the work the Newton Project is doing at the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) conference at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. I decided to go linguistic and focus on some of the intricacies of early modern hand and print. Here’s a short excerpt of part of…

Adventures in Huntingtonland, Pt. 3

It’s Sunday evening, 10 pm, and I am in Bloomington, Indiana. In the past week I have been staying and working with the marvellous Wally Hooper, a man of many qualities. He is an excellent scholar, an IT wizard, and most of all one of the most generous men I have ever met. I have…

Adventures in Huntingtonland, Pt. 2

It is a Friday afternoon, and California is experiencing another heat wave. It is not as hot as a few weeks ago, with temperatures well in the 100s/40s, but my daily bike routine, three miles uphill on Allen Avenue, is a continual challenge. It has been an exciting week.

Upcoming Newton Conference – Guess who…?

Very excited to let you all know I will speaking at the upcoming Newton conference at the Huntington Library in San Marino, California! October 10 and 11 will have a score of Newton scholars focussing on “All in Pieces?” – New Insights into the Structure of Newton’s Thought. My talk will centre around state of the…

Newton’s Working Practices (2) – I did it my way…

In our last episode we looked at Isaac Newton’s use of catchwords. Today our focus will be on his citation practices, with special regards to his command of ancient languages. At his grammar school in Grantham, the young Newton had received a basic but thorough training in Latin and Greek. When we look at his…