Of Mice and Men

When Isaac Newton died, in 1727, the scholarly world was eagerly awaiting the publication of his chronological studies. A topic he had been working on since his mid-thirties, in the soon published Chronology of Ancient Kingdoms Amended (January 1728) Newton proposed radically different dates for events such as the Fall of Troy and the voyage…

Finally Famous Pt II!

Part two of my Podcast with Thomas Hornigold at Physical Attraction is out now! Please find it here.

Finally famous!

Dear all, Last week I handed in my thesis on Isaac Newton’s chronological studies, titled: “Prophecy, History and Method: How and Why Isaac Newton studied Chronology”. The image, courtesy of Anca Boon of All Things Beautiful, is me looking smug and absolutely knackered, as I have been working 14-16 hour days for the past months…

Writing with Isaac in the 21st century

Two years ago, I attended a brilliant Digital Humanities conference in Sheffield, with several very impressive papers. I was allowed to present some of my research, received generous feedback, and subsequently responded to the call for papers for the conference proceedings. It took a while, but I just received word that the proceedings are out!…

Isaac Newton moves to Oxford

It has been nearly two months since my last blogpost, which is a) rather a long time, and b) quite unusual. Teaching duties, Newton Project business, my own research: yours truly has been busy. But I have some exciting news. Read on…

To the unknown scribe – Isaac Newton’s assistants

Over the past years I have been blogging about many things Newtonian. Some of these are of a more general nature, involving Newton’s life and works, while others are more directly related to my main research project. That main project involves Newton as a reader of books, a taker of notes, and as a composer…

Folding pages (Scenes from the Library of Isaac Newton, Part 2)

  Last week y’all got the crash course on how to recognise a Newton book, and boy did it pay off! There’s even rumours that more is to come soon. In the mean time yours truly spent an exciting week leafing through all sorts of rare books in the Huntington Library‘s Ahmanson Reading Room. Only…

Showcasing the Digital: Exhibit A

A new Newton post is on the way, but in the mean time, enjoy this report of the British Library Labs / Sussex Humanities Labs day held @SussexUni on April 8th! With links, vids, and old jokes.

Showcasing the Digital

For all those digitally inclined: the Sussex Humanities Lab and British Library Lab are co-hosting a one day event called Showcasing the Digital. Definitely worthwhile, I say, not in the least because, well, I happen to be one of the organisers… Be there!

SIN meets LSA

A few weeks back I had the opportunity to spend time with some of the wonderful people at Indiana University. Together we worked on all things Newtonian, and in particular on a computational method called Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA). This is a technique that originates from the early 80s and has some of its roots…

It’s all Greek to me

Last week I had the opportunity to show some of the work the Newton Project is doing at the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) conference at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. I decided to go linguistic and focus on some of the intricacies of early modern hand and print. Here’s a short excerpt of part of…

Adventures in Huntingtonland, Pt. 3

It’s Sunday evening, 10 pm, and I am in Bloomington, Indiana. In the past week I have been staying and working with the marvellous Wally Hooper, a man of many qualities. He is an excellent scholar, an IT wizard, and most of all one of the most generous men I have ever met. I have…