Little things matter – for want of a semicolon.

Originally posted on The Renaissance Mathematicus:
The Prof is back. A couple of years back Professor Christopher M. Graney, known to his friends as Chris, wrote a highly informative guest post for The Renaissance Mathematicus defending the honour of Tyco Brahe against his ignorant modern critics. In the mean time The Renaissance Mathematics was able to lure him into coming…

What did Catherine really think?

Originally posted on Sarah Dry:
It is a perennial problem, the scarcity of women in the history of science. Some responsibility lies in the present, with historians who may not dig hard enough for the remoter bits of information about women—often the sisters, daughters and wives of more famous men—who had the chance to do…

Scientiae 2014 : A blast from the past!

I have just returned from the Scientiae2014 conference in Vienna, and it was an absolute blast. An interdisciplinary gathering of Renaissance and Early Modern scholars, ranging from historians of science to art historians and from classically read papers to, let’s say, more spectacular performances, it was awesome. I met a number people in the flesh with…

Did Edmond tells Robert to, “sling his hooke!”?

Originally posted on The Renaissance Mathematicus:
The circumstances surrounding the genesis and publication of Newton’s magnum opus, Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica, and the priority dispute concerning the origins of the concept of universal gravity are amongst the best documented in the history of science. Two of the main protagonists wrote down their version of the…

A Rationale of Editing

I originally titled this post “Why digital editing?” – a title which I discarded for two reasons. The first is that while this blogpost focuses on a number of reasons why digital editing is important, there are many more. The second is that none of these reasons are specifically bound to digital editing, although there…