Hic Sunt Dracones…

It has been rather quiet at the Corpus Newtonicum front. Basically, I am writing my pants off, a dissertation in the making: Corpus Newtonicum: Reconstructing Isaac Newton’s working practices through his chronological studies. That does not sound very sexy and exciting, but boy it is. I have spent the past six months excavating Newton’s early forays…

It is elementary, Dr Watson

Recently, there have been a number of news items & publications all dealing in one way or the other with being a 21st century historian. In this blogpost I will discuss three of these, and try to reflect upon my own research and the bigger picture.

Summer thoughts…

Oxford, summer, unusually un-British weather. Currently setting up and drafting a chapter on Newton’s reading practices, with specific focus on his chronological readings. Turns out I find it extremely difficult to turn all the finds I collected over the past three years into a coherent narrative. Whatever happened to creativity?

Isaac Newton moves to Oxford

It has been nearly two months since my last blogpost, which is a) rather a long time, and b) quite unusual. Teaching duties, Newton Project business, my own research: yours truly has been busy. But I have some exciting news. Read on…

To the unknown scribe – Isaac Newton’s assistants

Over the past year and a half I have been blogging about many things Newtonian. Some of these are of a more general nature, involving Newton’s life and works, while others are more directly related to my main research project. That main project involves Newton as a reader of books, a taker of notes, and…

Hunting Season – Hiding on the Shelves

While Western Europe sees a record-braking heat-wave, all is well in San Marino! I am currently enjoying a two-month Dibner Research Fellowship at the Huntington Library. As devoted readers of this blog will remember, it’s a place I’ve been before (see here, here & here), and hope to return to sometime in the future. Staff,…

Folding pages (Scenes from the Library of Isaac Newton, Part 2)

  Last week y’all got the crash course on how to recognise a Newton book, and boy did it pay off! There’s even rumours that more is to come soon. In the mean time yours truly spent an exciting week leafing through all sorts of rare books in the Huntington Library‘s Ahmanson Reading Room. Only…

The world has heeded my plea! Another Newton book found.

Pablo Alvarez from the University of Michigan has just identified another Newton book! It’s Newton’s copy of Arthur Dee’s Fasciculus chemicus, abstrusæ Hermeticæ scientiæ, ingressum, progressum, coronidem, verbis apertissimis explicans…, which, as the more perceptive of you will see, is an alchemical treatise (of which Newton owned quite a lot). It was published in Paris in…

Showcasing the Digital: Exhibit A

A new Newton post is on the way, but in the mean time, enjoy this report of the British Library Labs / Sussex Humanities Labs day held @SussexUni on April 8th! With links, vids, and old jokes.

Elected by God

As I am writing this, I am in Berlin at the Renaissance Society of America’s annual conference. I am currently listening to a paper on Johannes Kepler’s astrological aspirations and his debate with Pico della Mirandola, which is quite intriguing. I have to admit, I am not an expert on Kepler: I have a fair…

Showcasing the Digital

For all those digitally inclined: the Sussex Humanities Lab and British Library Lab are co-hosting a one day event called Showcasing the Digital. Definitely worthwhile, I say, not in the least because, well, I happen to be one of the organisers… Be there!