The world has heeded my plea! Another Newton book found.

Pablo Alvarez from the University of Michigan has just identified another Newton book! It’s Newton’s copy of Arthur Dee’s Fasciculus chemicus, abstrusæ Hermeticæ scientiæ, ingressum, progressum, coronidem, verbis apertissimis explicans…, which, as the more perceptive of you will see, is an alchemical treatise (of which Newton owned quite a lot). It was published in Paris in…

Why? You endeavoured to embroil me with weomen…

Why. It is a word that I frequently entertain when I study Isaac Newton. There is no scientist about whom so much is written, yet I feel that we only know so little about the man. Most Newton biographers provide us with detailed descriptions of his life and works, using the abundance of source materials…

Showcasing the Digital: Exhibit A

A new Newton post is on the way, but in the mean time, enjoy this report of the British Library Labs / Sussex Humanities Labs day held @SussexUni on April 8th! With links, vids, and old jokes.

Elected by God

As I am writing this, I am in Berlin at the Renaissance Society of America’s annual conference. I am currently listening to a paper on Johannes Kepler’s astrological aspirations and his debate with Pico della Mirandola, which is quite intriguing. I have to admit, I am not an expert on Kepler: I have a fair…

Showcasing the Digital

For all those digitally inclined: the Sussex Humanities Lab and British Library Lab are co-hosting a one day event called Showcasing the Digital. Definitely worthwhile, I say, not in the least because, well, I happen to be one of the organisers… Be there!

Newton’s copy of Mede: Found!

I am extremely pleased to announce a major discovery done by my friend Stephen Snobelen, who is a Professor in History of Science at King’s College, Halifax, and an authority on Newton’s religion. He is also an important contributor to the Newton Project, singlehandedly responsible for all things found below this link. Hiding in plain…

It’s magic!

Last week the illustrious ThonyC wrote a blogpost titled “Do you believe in Magic?” in which he addressed the many, many glaring errors in yet another ‘revealing’ post about a number of important scientists of the past. The title of that post alone, ” These 5 men were scientific geniuses. They also thought magic is real”…

All was light – but was it?

According to many popular books on history of science, the modern world came to be in 1687. That year Isaac Newton published his Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica, more commonly known as the Principia, which was an instant hit and changed the way we think about the system of the world for good. No more weird Cartesian vortices, but gravitational…

Of alchemy and dogears

Behind this link you will find scans of a book. In a sense it is just a book, a copy of John Marsham’s Canon Chronicus Aegypticus to be precise, which is now in Linda Hall Library in Kansas City. There are many extant copies of this book, but the librarians at Linda Hall did a superb…

SIN meets LSA

A few weeks back I had the opportunity to spend time with some of the wonderful people at Indiana University. Together we worked on all things Newtonian, and in particular on a computational method called Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA). This is a technique that originates from the early 80s and has some of its roots…

It’s all Greek to me

Last week I had the opportunity to show some of the work the Newton Project is doing at the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) conference at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. I decided to go linguistic and focus on some of the intricacies of early modern hand and print. Here’s a short excerpt of part of…