Finally Famous Pt II!

Part two of my Podcast with Thomas Hornigold at Physical Attraction is out now! Please find it here.

It’s magic!

Last week the illustrious ThonyC wrote a blogpost titled “Do you believe in Magic?” in which he addressed the many, many glaring errors in yet another ‘revealing’ post about a number of important scientists of the past. The title of that post alone, ” These 5 men were scientific geniuses. They also thought magic is real”…

All was light – but was it?

According to many popular books on history of science, the modern world came to be in 1687. That year Isaac Newton published his Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica, more commonly known as the Principia, which was an instant hit and changed the way we think about the system of the world for good. No more weird Cartesian vortices, but gravitational…

Of alchemy and dogears

Behind this link you will find scans of a book. In a sense it is just a book, a copy of John Marsham’s Canon Chronicus Aegypticus to be precise, which is now in Linda Hall Library in Kansas City. There are many extant copies of this book, but the librarians at Linda Hall did a superb…

SIN meets LSA

A few weeks back I had the opportunity to spend time with some of the wonderful people at Indiana University. Together we worked on all things Newtonian, and in particular on a computational method called Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA). This is a technique that originates from the early 80s and has some of its roots…

“Was Newton a man?” – The Enigma

After twenty years of full time Newtonian research, Richard Westfall was said to be totally fed up with Newton. The author of Never at Rest, Westfall’s biographical studies had shown him the evil machinations of a full fledged tyrant, who used every means at hand to get what he wanted. He harassed John Flamsteed, the…

“Tired with this subject…” – Newton and Publication

Isaac Newton’s publication record is not exactly impressive: two articles, the New Theory of Light and Colours (1672) and the Hypothesis of Light (1675), and two books, the Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (1687) and Opticks (1703). Even if we include the second and third editions of the Principia, which contained major revisions, the various editions of Opticks, and all his (semi-) public correspondence,…