Finally Famous Pt II!

Part two of my Podcast with Thomas Hornigold at Physical Attraction is out now! Please find it here.

Finally famous!

Dear all, Last week I handed in my thesis on Isaac Newton’s chronological studies, titled: “Prophecy, History and Method: How and Why Isaac Newton studied Chronology”. The image, courtesy of Anca Boon of All Things Beautiful, is me looking smug and absolutely knackered, as I have been working 14-16 hour days for the past months…

Fake News!

Fake news is today’s big thing, but it has always been around. When it comes to Isaac Newton, I could (and perhaps should) easily publish an entire volume of myth and gossip. From his assumed insanity in the early 1690s (about which I blogged earlier) to the ascribing of his religious writings to his dotage…

Why? You endeavoured to embroil me with weomen…

Why. It is a word that I frequently entertain when I study Isaac Newton. There is no scientist about whom so much is written, yet I feel that we only know so little about the man. Most Newton biographers provide us with detailed descriptions of his life and works, using the abundance of source materials…

It’s magic!

Last week the illustrious ThonyC wrote a blogpost titled “Do you believe in Magic?” in which he addressed the many, many glaring errors in yet another ‘revealing’ post about a number of important scientists of the past. The title of that post alone, ” These 5 men were scientific geniuses. They also thought magic is real”…

All was light – but was it?

According to many popular books on history of science, the modern world came to be in 1687. That year Isaac Newton published his Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica, more commonly known as the Principia, which was an instant hit and changed the way we think about the system of the world for good. No more weird Cartesian vortices, but gravitational…

SIN meets LSA

A few weeks back I had the opportunity to spend time with some of the wonderful people at Indiana University. Together we worked on all things Newtonian, and in particular on a computational method called Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA). This is a technique that originates from the early 80s and has some of its roots…

It’s all Greek to me

Last week I had the opportunity to show some of the work the Newton Project is doing at the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) conference at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. I decided to go linguistic and focus on some of the intricacies of early modern hand and print. Here’s a short excerpt of part of…

Adventures in Huntingtonland, Pt. 2

It is a Friday afternoon, and California is experiencing another heat wave. It is not as hot as a few weeks ago, with temperatures well in the 100s/40s, but my daily bike routine, three miles uphill on Allen Avenue, is a continual challenge. It has been an exciting week.

Adventures in Huntingtonland, Pt. 1

I feel very privileged to be able to write this post. Here I am, sitting behind my desk on a quiet Saturday afternoon in Pasadena, California. The soaring heat of the past weeks has turned into a mellow breeze, and though the week to come promises interesting temperatures once more, it is all right. I…