Finally Famous Pt II!

Part two of my Podcast with Thomas Hornigold at Physical Attraction is out now! Please find it here.

Finally famous!

Dear all, Last week I handed in my thesis on Isaac Newton’s chronological studies, titled: “Prophecy, History and Method: How and Why Isaac Newton studied Chronology”. The image, courtesy of Anca Boon of All Things Beautiful, is me looking smug and absolutely knackered, as I have been working 14-16 hour days for the past months…

It is elementary, Dr Watson

Recently, there have been a number of news items & publications all dealing in one way or the other with being a 21st century historian. In this blogpost I will discuss three of these, and try to reflect upon my own research and the bigger picture.

Summer thoughts…

Oxford, summer, unusually un-British weather. Currently setting up and drafting a chapter on Newton’s reading practices, with specific focus on his chronological readings. Turns out I find it extremely difficult to turn all the finds I collected over the past three years into a coherent narrative. Whatever happened to creativity?

To the unknown scribe – Isaac Newton’s assistants

Over the past years I have been blogging about many things Newtonian. Some of these are of a more general nature, involving Newton’s life and works, while others are more directly related to my main research project. That main project involves Newton as a reader of books, a taker of notes, and as a composer…

Of alchemy and dogears

Behind this link you will find scans of a book. In a sense it is just a book, a copy of John Marsham’s Canon Chronicus Aegypticus to be precise, which is now in Linda Hall Library in Kansas City. There are many extant copies of this book, but the librarians at Linda Hall did a superb…

SIN meets LSA

A few weeks back I had the opportunity to spend time with some of the wonderful people at Indiana University. Together we worked on all things Newtonian, and in particular on a computational method called Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA). This is a technique that originates from the early 80s and has some of its roots…

It’s all Greek to me

Last week I had the opportunity to show some of the work the Newton Project is doing at the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) conference at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. I decided to go linguistic and focus on some of the intricacies of early modern hand and print. Here’s a short excerpt of part of…

Adventures in Huntingtonland, Pt. 2

It is a Friday afternoon, and California is experiencing another heat wave. It is not as hot as a few weeks ago, with temperatures well in the 100s/40s, but my daily bike routine, three miles uphill on Allen Avenue, is a continual challenge. It has been an exciting week.

Newton’s Working Practices (2) – I did it my way…

In our last episode we looked at Isaac Newton’s use of catchwords. Today our focus will be on his citation practices, with special regards to his command of ancient languages. At his grammar school in Grantham, the young Newton had received a basic but thorough training in Latin and Greek. When we look at his…

Dating Isaac

When in 1717 Princes Caroline learnt of Isaac Newton’s chronological studies through their mutual relation, the French Abbé Conti, she requested to see his work. Shortly after their meeting Newton presented her with his Short Chronicle, and allowed Conti to make a copy. That’s when things went a bit out of hand. Within months Conti…